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I am Creating my life?

“To enjoy good health, to bring true happiness to one’s family, to bring peace to all, one must first discipline and control one’s own mind. If a man can control his mind he can find the way to Enlightenment, and all wisdom and virtue will naturally come to him.” Buddha
Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/authors/buddha

I used to sometimes wonder if my life was on autopilot, or if someone else was causing all the experiences that kept happening to me? Honestly, I used to think that all the things that went wrong in my life were someone else’s fault; and that if things worked out well, I felt I was responsible for the job well done.

I was blessed however by many people, and book’s and a CORE class that G’D brought into my life. The inspiration from these people and experiences helped me to begin to see that I was responsible for my life, for all of it. Not just the things that went well. By my thoughts, my words and my actions, and decisions I made I formed my reality. I allowed everything that happened to me. This also greatly affected my children, and as the patterns I started flow outward like ripples in a pond, my grandchildren are now also affected by my actions.

This has not been a blissful experience by any means. Seeing the truth of reality, and the consequences of my decisions, and so many other things as well,  is like I mentioned before, in the words of Carl Jung, “There is no coming to consciousness without pain.” Considering this fact many people honestly prefer to just exist within the status quo as  it’s more blissful. We don’t have to see the truth about things, or  feel responsible for the consequences of our actions within the status quo.

However, “The truth will set you free!” (John 8:32) You can have no real freedom without truth. Nor can you have real happiness without freedom. So we can begin to see that to be free and happy we must embrace the truth. It is bigger then we realize however, so it is more of a journey then a destination.

May I invite you to dive into the deepest ocean depths of truth, as we can see it? Get your Inner Warrior on! Let’s look at some ancient wisdom for our lives today!

The gift of truth is the highest gift. The taste of truth is the sweetest taste. The joy of truth is the greatest joy. The extinction of craving is the end of suffering.”
― Thich Nhat Hanh <3

Your pain is the breaking of the shell that encloses your understanding. Khalil Gibran. (Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/authors/khalil_gibran)

When you are joyous, look deep into your heart and you shall find it is only that which has given you sorrow that is giving you joy. When you are sorrowful look again in your heart, and you shall see that in truth you are weeping for that which has been your delight. Khalil Gibran
(Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/khalil_gibran_121554)

The truth is like a diamond of unfathomable value. It also has many facets or aspects to it. I like to compare it to a story I read about three blind men each feeling an elephant for the first time, as depicted below.

“Blind men and elephant

The parable of the blind men and an elephant originated in the ancient Indian subcontinent, from where it has been widely diffused. It is a story of a group of blind men, who have never come across an elephant before and who learn and conceptualize what the elephant is like by touching it. Each blind man feels a different part of the elephant body, but only one part, such as the side or the tusk. They then describe the elephant based on their partial experience and their descriptions are in complete disagreement on what an elephant is. In some versions, they come to suspect that the other person is dishonest and they come to blows. The moral of the parable is that humans have a tendency to project their partial experiences as the whole truth, ignore other people’s partial experiences, and one should consider that one may be partially right and may have partial information.”[1](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blind_men_and_an_elephant) [2]

 Blind Men Appraising an Elephant by Ohara Donshu, Edo Period (early 19th century), Brooklyn Museum

As we go on this journey together to discover more of the deepest oceans of truth, and how it can help us to create better, happier and more fulfilling lives, let us remember we are but blind people feeling a small part of a very large elephant.

Namaste. May all your journeys be blessed with the light of truth, the warmth of love and the comfort of kindness.

Keridwan

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